Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Below is an extract of a letter from the Construction Manager at Nauru

Personal information has been deleted. He refers to the damage caused by the illegal boat people to the new facilities constructed for them last year.

"Sorry it has taken so long to get back to you. As you may have heard the camp we have been constructing over the past 8 months has been burned to the ground. The riot and subsequent fire  occurred on the evening of Friday the 19th

Since  then we have constructed a temporary camp (tent city) for the detainees that are not banged up in the Nauru jail.

The accommodation that was burned was of a very high standard and the dining facilities were second to none.

These bastards were being fed better than us worker bees and living in accommodation better than the locals.

Before I came here I was somewhat sympathetic toward refugees believing some were genuine. After the events of the 19th I am of the opinion that the group of male refugees here on Nauru are nothing more than violent arrogant criminals.

The Iranians are no better than the Tamils or any other of the ethnic groups that we have here - they are all the same.

These people are the scum of the earth and should under no circumstance be permitted to live in Australia.

I have attached a before and after snaps of the accommodation buildings only, the rest of the damage is out of the shot."

Via email

Tony Abbott confirms Badgerys Creek as site of second Sydney airport

At last, someone was game to make a decision

Prime Minister Tony Abbott has confirmed a second airport for Sydney, triggering tens of millions of dollars of infrastructure investment for Sydney's west.

After months of speculation, Badgerys Creek, 50 kilometres west of Sydney's CBD, was approved by cabinet on Tuesday as the location of the airport.

Construction of the airport is expected to begin in 2016 and will spur the creation of up to 4000 construction jobs at its peak.

Mr Abbott said the bulk of the investment for the airport would come from the private sector, with government to take the lead on building surrounding infrastructure, including roads.

The cost of building the airport is estimated at $2.5 billion.

Sydney Airport has first right of refusal to build and operate the airport.

"It's a long, overdue decision which, to be honest, has been shirked and squibbed by successive governments for far too long," Mr Abbott said.

"I also want to stress that the government's approach will be roads first, airport second, because we don't want the people of western Sydney to have an airport without having the decent transport infrastructure that western Sydney deserves."

Mr Abbott said the project would create 60,000 new jobs for western Sydney once the airport was fully operational.

The Prime Minister said details about how the infrastructure package will be funded will be made in the coming days.  It's understood the federal and NSW governments are close to finalising a deal on how much federal money will be on the table.  An initial figure of $200 million that had been floated was insufficient in the view of the NSW government.

"I think this is a good news story for western Sydney," Mr Abbott said.  "It's good news for jobs and, because of the importance of Sydney in our national economy, it's good news for Australia."

Mr Abbott played down concerns that airport noise would become an issue at the new flightpath in the way it has for residents around Sydney Airport.

"I don't believe this is going to be anything like the problem at Badgerys that it has been at Mascot," he said.  "For a couple of reasons - first, because, quite frankly, people don't want to travel in the middle of the night.  "And, second, because we are just dealing with far, far fewer people.

"If you look at the noise footprint, some 4000 people live within a Badgerys' noise footprint.  "The equivalent footprint at Sydney is 130,000. So I just don't think it's going to be anything like the issue that it is elsewhere."

Mr Abbott added: "We are certainly not saying there will be a curfew."

Qantas immediately welcomed the announcement on Tuesday, with chief executive Alan Joyce describing Badgerys Creek as the right site.  "After decades of debate, we applaud today's announcement by the Prime Minister," Mr Joyce said.

"The role of second airports has been well-established in several of the world's major capitals. Sydney is the key gateway for air traffic in and out of Australia and the benefits of having two major airports will be felt nationwide."

Western Sydney Airport Alliance spokesman David Borger said the decision to build at Badgerys Creek was long overdue.  He said residents would support the decision because it will create jobs and raise living standards.

However, western Sydney Labor MP Ed Husic said locals are being "blackmailed".  "They say 'If you want better infrastructure you have to support the airport and by virtue of blocking the airport you won't get better infrastructure'," he told ABC Radio.


How the wog sank the Irishman

A small note:  I use "wog" as a general term for a person of Mediterranean origin.  If I intended to be offensive, I would have said "wop"

BARRY O’Farrell has resigned as NSW Premier following his appearance at the Independent Commission against Corruption yesterday.

Mr O’Farrell denied receiving a $3000 bottle of wine from Australian Water Holdings boss Nick Di Girolamo yesterday but resigned today after it was revealed that he sent Mr Di Girolamo a card thanking him for the gift.

“I will be resigning the position and enabling a new Liberal leader to be elected, someone who will then become the Premier of New South Wales,” Mr O’Farrell said in a press conference today.
He insisted he did not “wilfully mislead” the watchdog yesterday, but said he accepted the consequences. He described the missing bottle of wine as a “significant memory fail on my part”.

After being recalled to ICAC today to give further evidence, Mr O’Farrell confirmed that the handwriting on a thankyou note presented to the commission was his.

He said that he gave his best recollection to ICAC yesterday but was “clearly mistaken”. He said he had no idea what happened to the 1959 bottle of Grange.

Mr O’Farrell said dealings with Australian Water Holdings were done appropriately, and a contract signed with Sydney Water was completed at arm’s length from the government.

Referring to the wine in his speech this morning, Mr O’Farrell said: “I can’t explain the arrival of a gift that I have no recollection of, or its absence, which I still can’t fathom.
“I accept the consequences in an orderly way.”

During his testimony yesterday, he categorically denied ever receiving the wine.  “If I had received a bottle of 1959 Penfolds Grange I would have known about it and, and I did not receive a bottle of Penfolds Grange,” he told the hearing.

His resignation will be effective from next week, as soon as a committee of parliamentarians can meet to appoint a new leader.


Childers child 'abduction': man charged

Chloe Campbell

Detectives have charged a man over the alleged abduction of a child from Childers.  The man was not the toddler's father, a police spokesman said.

The child was reported missing from her home, about 300 kilometres north of Brisbane, last Thursday morning.

Police, SES and community members launched a large search of the central Queensland town and the child was found in good health about 42 hours later.

Overnight police charged a 45-year-old from South Isis with abduction, one count of break and enter and one count of deprivation of liberty in relation to the incident.

He is due to appear in the Bundaberg Magistrates Court on Wednesday morning, and police are also expected to provide further details of their investigation.

Police investigating the child's disappearance collected DNA samples from more than 20 people, including family friends and “other people around town whose names have come up", Detective Inspector Bruce McNab said.

Earlier this week, Inspector McNab said police were following a number of leads and made inquiries as far south as Tweed Heads in New South Wales.


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